Hazelwood Health Study


Join the conversation with Hazelwood Health Study researchers

Engagement time frame:

The Hazelwood Health Study engagement process will close on 28 June, 2019.


Current findings

Over the past five years, Monash University has led the Hazelwood Health Study – a long term health study established in response to community concern regarding potential health impacts from the Hazelwood mine fire in 2014.

Community helped focus the current areas of study - community wellbeing, early childhood development, respiratory, cardiovascular and mental health, infants, school children, adults, pregnant women and older people.

The study has released numerous findings to date. Summaries can be found at www.hazelwoodhealthstudy.org.au

Future refinements

The Hazelwood Health Study, in conjunction with various stakeholders, is reviewing the study to date, and the lessons learned along the way, to plan the next five years of the study.

This review provides the opportunity to look at how the study can:

  • build on its previous work in a way which continues to meet community expectations
  • shape services for the future health of the Latrobe Valley
  • guide responses to future emergency events.

Based on findings to date, priority will continue to be given to research activities that focus on:

  • children’s development and their educational outcomes
  • pregnancy
  • respiratory and psychological health outcomes
  • health service use
  • cancer
  • mortality
  • community wellbeing.

The following study refinements are proposed :

Respiratory health

  • Continue planned clinical assessments in years seven and nine
  • Continue analysis of long-term respiratory health outcomes through the assessment of administrative health records such as Medicare
  • Expand the clinical assessment to research any link between mental health and respiratory outcomes.

Children’s development and educational outcomes

  • Expand the assessments to include additional measures of infant’s immune function, family functioning and psychological health
  • Expand the collection of educational outcomes in school-aged children with the use of NAPLAN data
  • Continue collection of infant’s health symptoms via parent-reported diaries.

Cardiovascular health

  • Continue and expand assessments of infants’ heart health
  • Continue tracking adult cardiovascular outcomes through administrative health records such as Medicare and hospital admissions.

Psychological Impacts

  • Continue the planned follow up of adults via the 2019 Adult Psychological Impacts Survey
  • Introduce cross-stream collaboration with the Community Wellbeing stream to explore the intersection between individual and community wellbeing
  • Introduce cross-stream collaboration with the Early Life Follow-up stream to conduct the survey of parent’s psychological health.

Community Wellbeing

  • Continue planned data collection in years six and eight, including interviews, focus groups and media analysis
  • Introduce cross-stream collaboration with the Psychological Impacts stream, Adult Survey data and Hazelinks to explore the intersection between individual and community wellbeing
  • Develop a tool to bring together existing data to map the strengths and capacities within the community that contribute to community wellbeing.

Health service use

  • For Adult Survey participants who consented, continue to analyse identified health records such as ambulance attendances, emergency presentations and hospital admissions
  • For Early Life Follow-up families who consented, continue to analyse identified health service and medication records such as Medicare and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme data.
  • Increase emphasis on tracking health service use for the wider Latrobe Valley and Gippsland population through the use of large deidentified administrative health datasets such as ambulance Medicare, emergency presentations and hospital admissions data.

Cancer

  • The study will continue to focus on cancer outcomes in the community with both identified and deidentified linkages to the National Cancer Registry.

Mortality

  • The study will focus on rates and causes of death in the community with both identified and deidentified linkages to the National Death Index.



More information

To find out more about the Hazelwood Health Study findings visit www.hazelwoodhealthstudy.org.au



Join the conversation with Hazelwood Health Study researchers

Engagement time frame:

The Hazelwood Health Study engagement process will close on 28 June, 2019.


Current findings

Over the past five years, Monash University has led the Hazelwood Health Study – a long term health study established in response to community concern regarding potential health impacts from the Hazelwood mine fire in 2014.

Community helped focus the current areas of study - community wellbeing, early childhood development, respiratory, cardiovascular and mental health, infants, school children, adults, pregnant women and older people.

The study has released numerous findings to date. Summaries can be found at www.hazelwoodhealthstudy.org.au

Future refinements

The Hazelwood Health Study, in conjunction with various stakeholders, is reviewing the study to date, and the lessons learned along the way, to plan the next five years of the study.

This review provides the opportunity to look at how the study can:

  • build on its previous work in a way which continues to meet community expectations
  • shape services for the future health of the Latrobe Valley
  • guide responses to future emergency events.

Based on findings to date, priority will continue to be given to research activities that focus on:

  • children’s development and their educational outcomes
  • pregnancy
  • respiratory and psychological health outcomes
  • health service use
  • cancer
  • mortality
  • community wellbeing.

The following study refinements are proposed :

Respiratory health

  • Continue planned clinical assessments in years seven and nine
  • Continue analysis of long-term respiratory health outcomes through the assessment of administrative health records such as Medicare
  • Expand the clinical assessment to research any link between mental health and respiratory outcomes.

Children’s development and educational outcomes

  • Expand the assessments to include additional measures of infant’s immune function, family functioning and psychological health
  • Expand the collection of educational outcomes in school-aged children with the use of NAPLAN data
  • Continue collection of infant’s health symptoms via parent-reported diaries.

Cardiovascular health

  • Continue and expand assessments of infants’ heart health
  • Continue tracking adult cardiovascular outcomes through administrative health records such as Medicare and hospital admissions.

Psychological Impacts

  • Continue the planned follow up of adults via the 2019 Adult Psychological Impacts Survey
  • Introduce cross-stream collaboration with the Community Wellbeing stream to explore the intersection between individual and community wellbeing
  • Introduce cross-stream collaboration with the Early Life Follow-up stream to conduct the survey of parent’s psychological health.

Community Wellbeing

  • Continue planned data collection in years six and eight, including interviews, focus groups and media analysis
  • Introduce cross-stream collaboration with the Psychological Impacts stream, Adult Survey data and Hazelinks to explore the intersection between individual and community wellbeing
  • Develop a tool to bring together existing data to map the strengths and capacities within the community that contribute to community wellbeing.

Health service use

  • For Adult Survey participants who consented, continue to analyse identified health records such as ambulance attendances, emergency presentations and hospital admissions
  • For Early Life Follow-up families who consented, continue to analyse identified health service and medication records such as Medicare and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme data.
  • Increase emphasis on tracking health service use for the wider Latrobe Valley and Gippsland population through the use of large deidentified administrative health datasets such as ambulance Medicare, emergency presentations and hospital admissions data.

Cancer

  • The study will continue to focus on cancer outcomes in the community with both identified and deidentified linkages to the National Cancer Registry.

Mortality

  • The study will focus on rates and causes of death in the community with both identified and deidentified linkages to the National Death Index.



More information

To find out more about the Hazelwood Health Study findings visit www.hazelwoodhealthstudy.org.au